OSHA Announces Top 10 Violations for FY 2018

The top 10 violations seen by OSHA in fiscal year 2018 are as follows:

10. Personal Protective and Lifesaving Equipment—Eye and Face Protection: 1926.102, with 1,536 violations
9. Machine Guarding: 1926.212, with 1,972 violations
8. Fall Protection—Training Requirements: 1926.503, with 1,982 violations
7. Powered Industrial Trucks: 1910.178, with 2,294 violations
6. Ladders: 1926.1053, with 2,812 violations
5. Lockout/Tagout: 1910.147, with 2,944 violations
4. Respiratory Protection: 1910.134, with 3,118 violations
3. Scaffolds—General Requirements: 1926.451, with 3,336 violations
2. Hazard Communication: 1910.1200, with 4,552 violations
1. Fall Protection—General Requirements: 1926.501, with 7,720 violations

Protecting Workers from Silica Hazards in the Workplace Video

Protecting Workers from Silica Hazards in the Workplace Video

New video from OSHA explaining Silica Hazards in the workplace.   Unsure where to start?   Mobile Health Diagnostics compliance experts are available for Site Surveys, Air/Silica Monitoring, Data Analysis and Compliance Recommendations (Engineering Controls, Workplace Practices, Respiratory Protection)

OSHA Limits on Workplace Noise Feed Complaints

OSHA Limits on Workplace Noise Feed Complaints


Just how loud is too loud for employees in a workplace? According to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), the problem of ear-damaging worksite sounds is more widespread than you might think, and both employees and employers are paying the price.

At least 22 million workers are exposed to potentially damaging noise at work each year, OSHA reports. In 2017, employers were required to pay $1.5 million in penalties for not protecting workers from noise. OSHA also estimates that approximately $242 million is spent on workers’ compensation claims for hearing loss.

OSHA To Award $10.5M In Workplace Safety Training Grants

OSHA To Award $10.5M In Workplace Safety Training Grants

On August 3, OSHA will publish announcements for Susan Harwood Training Grants funding opportunities for Targeted Topic Training Grants, Training and Educational Materials Development Grants, and Capacity Building Grants in the Federal Register. A total of $10.5 million is available for nonprofit organizations including community and faith-based organizations, employer associations, labor unions, joint labor/management associations, Indian tribes, and colleges and universities.

Tips for Protecting Workers Against Silica

Tips for Protecting Workers Against Silica

Repsiratory Protection

According to 2016 OSHA regulations, the Permissible Exposure Level (PEL) for respirable crystalline silica is 5mg/m3. Above these levels, a respirator is required. Respirators equipped with the N95, R95, or P95 filters provide an adequate degree of protection. N99, R99, P99, N100, R100, and P100 filters are also suitable, but will not provide a sizable difference in protection when compared with the filters mentioned above.

These respirators can be used only of the silica concentration is less than 10 times the PEL.

Regardless of filter type and number, a fit test should be performed when wearing a half-face or full-face mask to ensure proper fit. Without a proper seal, the user is at risk of inhaling dust.

When the silica concentration is more than 10 times the PEL, a supplied air respiratoris required. It provides a superior degree of protection and also protects the eyes.


Respirable Crystalline Silica: Regulations and Considerations

Respirable Crystalline Silica: Regulations and Considerations

What is Respirable Crystalline Silica and Where Is it Found? 
Silica (silicon dioxide/SiO2) can exist in crystalline or non-crystalline form. The standard is intended to provide protection from exposures to the crystalline form, when it exists in or is made into an especially small size, referred to as "respirable." "Respirable" particles are those of a size (approximately less than 10 µm) that when inhaled have the potential to reach the deeper regions of the lung. OSHA-required exposure assessments must be conducted with respirable particle size selective samplers meeting International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 7708:1995.